India Delhi #1 Friendship day, Lord Krishna.

Being met at the airport with flowers is most girls dream! Today this happened, a friend picked us up bearing flowers for friendship day, what a wonderful start to a trip! The first Sunday of August was declared Friendship Day and made a holiday in the USA in 1935 as a day dedicated to friends and friendship- how did I not know about this!

The huge proud flag flying at Connaught Place, Delhi

This is my first trip to India with a friend rather than family or solo and it’s her first trip so it’s very important to me she loves this place as much as I do.

August is not necessarily the ideal month to visit as monsoon is still in full swing but tickets were cheap so off we went.

Green Park is a residential neighbourhood of Delhi close to Hauz Khaus, a trendy cosmopolitan area which has numerous cafes and hangouts plus a lovely park. The hotel is, well, ok… it’s clean and comfortable which is all you need when busy out seeing the town, so no recommendations here for this hotel, but the area, yes.

Our first full day was a public holiday in India know as Raksha Bandhan. The day celebrates the love between brothers and sisters. It was one of the quietest days I have ever experienced in India!

ISKCON TEMPLE

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Lords Gaura and Nitai

Located south of the city and near the Baha’i Lotus Temple is the International Society For Krishna Consciousness temple. A truly magnificent and joyous place. Today marked the celebration of Lord Balarama’s appearance day ( birthday) It was colorful, loud and festive. There is a 30 min Vedic show outlining the basics of the Bhagavad Gita which was well done and informative.

An avatar of Krishna as Nrsimhadeva, protector of devotees

On our way out a bird fell from the tree to the ground without a head and its spine protruding out of its body!!! Oh, said the man next to us, must have been a tree snake- good grief !!! I am wondering if this has any significance for me and am trying/hoping to think this is not an ominous sign in any way!!!!

BENGALI MARKET

A trip to Delhi for me is not complete without a visit to this small area. This was where we lost all our clothes once in a fire at the dry cleaners! I was so pleased to see they had rebuilt the business! The sweet shops here are magnificent and a cheap thali lunch is around 280 R for two people   ( approx $6 AUD)

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Chole Bhature, a favourite chick pea dish


The sweet cabinets at Bengali Market

Then came the rain, and wow did it rain, quite spectacular, although most of what we planned for the day was outdoor so plan B was to head back to the hotel, drenched but happy. The rain initially makes us grim but it soon seeps away and leaves a lush green warmth from the newly washed trees.

After an hour or so of planning it was off the Hauz Khaus, the hip trendy area of Delhi for happy hour and dinner. Again, being a public holiday this vibrant nightlife area was quite quiet tonight so some modern Sufi music at Reloaded, a rooftop bar was just perfect- and the rain had stopped!

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It’s good to be back Delhi, see you tomorrow.

Japanese Fermented Tsukemono made super easy

Learning how to make dishes in different countries is part of my travel experience and life. I was fortunate enough to be tutored briefly by a Japanese chef in Shojin Ryori style cooking and it was there  I learned this most basic of all dishes and my jaw dropped as to how easy this was! Seriously there are two ingredients and five minutes of prep that’s it!

Although what I am presenting is super easy I would never underestimate the years of training and skill involved in this style of Zen Buddhist cooking. This is a complete cheats way to achieving a similar result and makes this way of cooking accessible to us.

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Hakusai No Shiozuke

Hakusai No Shiozuke is Japanese pickled cabbage. I got so excited after making this I have been pickling everything I could employing this method. I posted earlier a recipe for fermented cucumbers on sticks. Also super easy, and a healthy summer snack.

The larger term for pickles is Tsukemono which literally means “fermented vegetables”  Fermentation is such a current topic today and it’s all about gut health. Recent visits to Japan have left me wondering how the Japanese are so healthy as there is an incredible amount of processed food in the diet and not too much of an abundance of fresh raw fruit and vegetables due to high costs.

Many countries that do not have an abundance of vegetables often have their version of fermented vegetables such as Kim Chi in Korea, Sauerkraut in parts of Europe and so on.

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Typical little plate of pickles served before a meal

Koji rice is cooked rice that gets inoculated with a mold which then ferments the rice. At least that’s a very basic explanation. This fermented Koji is used to make other more well-known foods such as miso, sake, soy sauce, and mirin.

Shio Koji can be made, but as this form of fermentation was new to me I think buying the already fermented product is probably much more efficient and safe. The brand I have found easily in Australia is this one    When I say easily, look in the Japanese food section of larger Asian stores…

Shio Koji

Shio Koji

There are a number of different recipes for Hakusai No Shiozuke available but this one is just the most simple is staggering.

Ingredients

Cabbage ( either wombok or regular)

Japanese Cucumbers ( or Lebanese)

Shio Koji

Ziplock bag

Slice the cabbage finely, about two cups full. Slice the cucumbers diagonally finely or on a mandolin. Put in a ziplock bag with about 1 Tablespoon of the koji rice, massage this well into the cabbage. Let this sit and gently shake from time to time. You will notice the cabbage becoming limper and eventually after about two hours it has turned into a pickle. Seriously that’s it!!!

Add variety like shredded carrots, chilli flakes, what ever you feel like. There you have it, a tasty Japanese Tsukemono. Have fun!

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Shojin Ryori lunch with the magic pickle in the centre

Japan: Finding Vegan Food ..Easy?

Let’s face it, in the land of sushi and sashimi being a meatless and fishless eater was bound to be a bit of a challenge right?.. I would love to say, Nah it was easy, but no it is not easy. In fact, it was more of a challenge than I thought and many times I ended up eating only bread, not ideal for any number of reasons!

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Kyushu Jangara Ramen Harajuku fantastic bowl of goodness

The Japanese are famed for their longevity and healthy diets. So I will add this disclaimer…. I love Japan, its food, culture, people, and history, but I find a lot of food to be very processed and over packaged. A home cooked meal was high on my priority list after a week of eating, what I felt to be a mostly unhealthy diet. A trip to the market was interesting of course but so disappointing to find single items of food such as a tomato, or a ( singular) potato in its own package, and expensive to boot. Eating out seemed to be a cheaper alternative.

My Didi in Tokyo, who owns the fabulous chain of Indian restaurants gave me some insight into this. Vegetables are very expensive and are often a money losing dish at a restaurant as the general view held is that ‘why should veges cost more than meat…’  I found this sad and frustrating, to say the least.  Of course, people with some insight into the cruelty of animal farming get it, but to the general population, it seems animals are seen as food. That subject is not where I want to go with this post but rather to assist you on a visit with what to do! I must say though how is it then that the Japanese diet is hailed as one of the most healthy on earth. I wonder if this will be the case in the upcoming years as the western diet pervades the traditional way of life.  Any comments welcome please!

On a daily basis, my search for vege food became almost an obsession. I thank God for apps such as Yelp and Happy Cow which stopped me from starving. Okay, okay I am embellishing this slightly for effect! I tended to use Yelp due to the fact it lists places that have vege options whereas Happy Cow tends to be only those places that list with them and identify as veg only. If it wasn’t for the kindness of Funky Love Bunny ( yes that is his real name at Zen Japan in Coffs Harbour, Australia who has this awesome conversion card I surely would have eaten bread for two weeks.  He has sized it so it can be printed on a business card- wonderful idea. Please go visit Funky and his wife Emi at their fantastic Izakaya, well worth the trip.Vegan Convesion Card

I read up on many places to visit but once in a country full of more restaurants than people ( feels like it at times) I found trying to get to these places a bit overwhelming. A few in Tokyo are worthy of mention and relatively easy to find. Kyushu jangara is easy to find, but rather than give directions here, check it on Yelp and follow the map. Also worthy of mention is ramen at Tokyo station called T’s Tan Tan 

On the upside, Japanese food does not contain as much dairy as the western diet so I found that trips to the local convenience store were great. Lawsons stores have a great variety of takeout food and most people understand the word vegetaian. The rice onigiri parcels were the most consistent in terms of selection and even managed to find brown rice offerings. there are always salads and vege sushi available.

Compassionate cooking, vegan, plant based what ever you identify with is on the rise, especially in Australia. Other parts of the world have their traditional meat free dishes which are usually side dishes, and there are plenty of tasty ones in Japan, but on the whole, I found Japan not easy and certainly options were often limited to salad, so be prepared to be viewed as a weirdo for wanting to not eat meat. But hey whats new huh!

Japan: Only a week vacay?

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Fushimi-Inari-Taisha Shrine

Japan used to be considered one of the worlds most expensive destinations  and a lot of people I speak to still seem to be of that opinion ( without having been there) Yes there are VERY expensive things to do , see , eat and buy but the average vacation in Japan need not be so at all. In fact it is quite cheap in certain areas, especially food. Of course this is somewhat subjective, and I would point out that if you are backpacking on a tight budget as always you can hunt out the cheapest way to do things.

Japan is a wonderful country steeped in many ancient traditions and has a culture quite unique maybe cultivated whilst having been cut off from the western world for nearly 300 years in the time of the Shoguns. Today’s Japan is high tech, busy and colourful , yet traditions and history have deep underlying roots in modern day Japan also.

Why do people raise their eyebrows when I say I’m going to Japan for a week? business people do it all the time – and they work in between! Change your mindset….wow a whole seven days, what can I do with that? stay at home on the couch or hot foot it to the airport. I know which one I pick. This trip was seven days and I went to Japan.

As an ex flight attendant I am only too familiar with long flights and body clocks, so I opt for day flights where possible… what a waste of a precious days vacation you say? wrong… my logic is that a day flight gives me the opportunity to do nothing for more than ten hours, watch movies, snack, doze… I feel like I have had a week on the couch- then I am not fried by a restless night trying to sleep on a usually pretty uncomfortable seat ( I opt for cheap tix so I can travel more)

Even as I am writing this I am planning my next ski trip. This time I think it will be to Japan again. It looks awesome, and I see that Jetstar also have amazing package deals on again.

MY SEVEN DAY ITINERARY

TOKYO- 3 Nights

KYOTO- 2 Nights

OSAKA- 2 Nights

This time I flew with Jetstar via Cairns. They have some no brainer deals on , especially when the return flight is for free, or two for one deals. However be prepared for a really early stat and a wait at cairns including reclaiming luggage from the first leg . I came from Sydney so that is a domestic flight. At least you only have to check in one hour before. Otherwise my standby website to check is Skyscanner as thats such a good comparison site. I have also used Zuji and Kayak but found the interface on Skyscanner much easier.

AIRBNB OR HOTELS?

I have been an Airbnb host for over two years and loved the experience of it, but rarely have I used it as a traveler, so this time I stayed in Tokyo and Kyoto with Airbnb, and Osaka in a small hotel. So here is a plug from me for Airbnb as I cant recommend it more highly. Of course each property has reviews so ultimately it is your decision as to where you stay and at what price point but I am very happy so far. If you want to find out more or book one of the places I stayed at it would be awesome if you want to use my referral key .  

As a solo female traveler I felt very safe. I did opt to take the entire place to myself rather than a room in another persons house, but that was simply my choice and was not at all to do with personal safety.

WHAT TO PACK

Well, once you get to know me a bit more you will realize that although I am spontaneous , I do have a regime of a few essentials I recommend to everyone travelling here:

Firstly, as far as the weather is concerned, I am not a weather blog, so please check google or a weather app….seriously the easiest answer to all these questions.

Toiletries– Pack your essentials everything else can be bought, however do not rely on any written English on anything. As I embarrassingly found out having to ask for corn plasters! Bring any medications you may need from home, and of course make sure you have travel insurance.

Clothing- Use common sense and dress for whatever season your research recommends! Do however wear darn good walking shoes, My Sketchers are the only shoes I have ever worn out, just awesome. I do take some pretty ones for going out in of course.

Electronics- Beware the voltage change so I don’t bother with hairdryers- most hotels and Airbnb  have them . DO get some plug adapters though.

COOKING CLASSES

As i move on with my travels you will see that i try to attend cooking classes wherever I go. I think it gives me a better understanding of the culture and make up of the people and countries. I am also a passionate cook and now have a small catering company so its important to learn as much as possible and have new ideas on the ready!

Ok… more to come on each city

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OFF TO THE LAND OF THE RISING SUN