Japanese Fermented Tsukemono made super easy

Learning how to make dishes in different countries is part of my travel experience and life. I was fortunate enough to be tutored briefly by a Japanese chef in Shojin Ryori style cooking and it was there  I learned this most basic of all dishes and my jaw dropped as to how easy this was! Seriously there are two ingredients and five minutes of prep that’s it!

Although what I am presenting is super easy I would never underestimate the years of training and skill involved in this style of Zen Buddhist cooking. This is a complete cheats way to achieving a similar result and makes this way of cooking accessible to us.

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Hakusai No Shiozuke

Hakusai No Shiozuke is Japanese pickled cabbage. I got so excited after making this I have been pickling everything I could employing this method. I posted earlier a recipe for fermented cucumbers on sticks. Also super easy, and a healthy summer snack.

The larger term for pickles is Tsukemono which literally means “fermented vegetables”  Fermentation is such a current topic today and it’s all about gut health. Recent visits to Japan have left me wondering how the Japanese are so healthy as there is an incredible amount of processed food in the diet and not too much of an abundance of fresh raw fruit and vegetables due to high costs.

Many countries that do not have an abundance of vegetables often have their version of fermented vegetables such as Kim Chi in Korea, Sauerkraut in parts of Europe and so on.

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Typical little plate of pickles served before a meal

Koji rice is cooked rice that gets inoculated with a mold which then ferments the rice. At least that’s a very basic explanation. This fermented Koji is used to make other more well-known foods such as miso, sake, soy sauce, and mirin.

Shio Koji can be made, but as this form of fermentation was new to me I think buying the already fermented product is probably much more efficient and safe. The brand I have found easily in Australia is this one    When I say easily, look in the Japanese food section of larger Asian stores…

Shio Koji

Shio Koji

There are a number of different recipes for Hakusai No Shiozuke available but this one is just the most simple is staggering.

Ingredients

Cabbage ( either wombok or regular)

Japanese Cucumbers ( or Lebanese)

Shio Koji

Ziplock bag

Slice the cabbage finely, about two cups full. Slice the cucumbers diagonally finely or on a mandolin. Put in a ziplock bag with about 1 Tablespoon of the koji rice, massage this well into the cabbage. Let this sit and gently shake from time to time. You will notice the cabbage becoming limper and eventually after about two hours it has turned into a pickle. Seriously that’s it!!!

Add variety like shredded carrots, chilli flakes, what ever you feel like. There you have it, a tasty Japanese Tsukemono. Have fun!

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Shojin Ryori lunch with the magic pickle in the centre

Matcha: aka Green Tea Powder- love it or hate it?

Much ado about Matcha. The finely ground Japanese green tea powder that is being used in everything from lattes, ice cream, noodles, bread, and of course in its traditional form as tea. So what does this mean and do you love it or hate it?

 

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LOVERS AND CONVERTS

Matcha is a finely ground green tea powder known to be a mood enhancer with 137 times the antioxidants of a cup of standard green tea. Amino acids called L-theanine abound in matcha and this, combined with natural caffeine offers a sustained calm alertness according to some aficionados.

So apart from the mood enhancing benefits matcha is touted as a superfood.  A read of the health benefits of matcha at Matchasource.com lists them as:

  • Is packed with antioxidants including the powerful EGCg
  • Boosts metabolism and burns calories
  • Detoxifies effectively and naturally
  • Calms the mind and relaxes the body
  • Is rich in fiber, chlorophyll and vitamins
  • Enhances mood and aids in concentration
  • Provides vitamin C, selenium, chromium, zinc and magnesium
  • Prevents disease
  • Lowers cholesterol and blood sugar

With all these benefits for the mind and health no wonder we are all going mad over matcha, you love it or hate it?

Matcha is part of the Japanese psyche and has formed part of the culture for many many years. A google search will yield any number of articles on history and uses. This blog is more about the new uses of this bright green powder in the western world.

We traveled to New York  in 2015 and visited the newly opened  Matcha Bar NYC

This was one of the first dedicated Matcha bars around, and I see they have also opened in Los Angeles. I can’t see a food menu on their site, but their lattes were superb!

 

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Matcha Bar New York

Australia could be considered to be up there with the best in terms of vegan and vegetarian eateries. The vegan movement generally goes hand in hand with a healthier lifestyle and the team at Matcha Mylk bar in Melbourne have made it all about this green superfood. Check out their menu and really its just a case of what can’t you add matcha to!

Matcha Burger

Matcha Burgers at Matcha Mylk Bar, Melbourne , Australia

 

HATERS

This particular word doesn’t get used much around here, and certainly, matcha doesn’t polarise people in the way a brussel sprout does.  So lets put aside the nay sayers, as they are always there to throw water on a fire and label any fresh, new healthy initiative as a “fad” or “hipster” .  Yes, there are indeed people out there who don’t like ( or I prefer to say are not yet converted) Matcha. This particularly cynical site has a good whine about it!  In their defense, the article is mostly about over hyped claims of the nutritional value of Matcha……The flavor takes some getting used to as it is slightly bitter and can be a bit chalky if not made properly. But really whats not to love? if it’s too bitter add a sprinkle of sugar or agave ( for the anti sugar crew)

As a chef, I run a small catering company and am always looking for new and innovative ways to use this beautiful green silky powder.  If you are down our part of the world make sure to check out Matcha Mylk Bar ( no it’s not my place, I just think it’s great!)

Well, its time for a latte- make mine a Matcha one, please.

 

Japan: Finding Vegan Food ..Easy?

Let’s face it, in the land of sushi and sashimi being a meatless and fishless eater was bound to be a bit of a challenge right?.. I would love to say, Nah it was easy, but no it is not easy. In fact, it was more of a challenge than I thought and many times I ended up eating only bread, not ideal for any number of reasons!

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Kyushu Jangara Ramen Harajuku fantastic bowl of goodness

The Japanese are famed for their longevity and healthy diets. So I will add this disclaimer…. I love Japan, its food, culture, people, and history, but I find a lot of food to be very processed and over packaged. A home cooked meal was high on my priority list after a week of eating, what I felt to be a mostly unhealthy diet. A trip to the market was interesting of course but so disappointing to find single items of food such as a tomato, or a ( singular) potato in its own package, and expensive to boot. Eating out seemed to be a cheaper alternative.

My Didi in Tokyo, who owns the fabulous chain of Indian restaurants gave me some insight into this. Vegetables are very expensive and are often a money losing dish at a restaurant as the general view held is that ‘why should veges cost more than meat…’  I found this sad and frustrating, to say the least.  Of course, people with some insight into the cruelty of animal farming get it, but to the general population, it seems animals are seen as food. That subject is not where I want to go with this post but rather to assist you on a visit with what to do! I must say though how is it then that the Japanese diet is hailed as one of the most healthy on earth. I wonder if this will be the case in the upcoming years as the western diet pervades the traditional way of life.  Any comments welcome please!

On a daily basis, my search for vege food became almost an obsession. I thank God for apps such as Yelp and Happy Cow which stopped me from starving. Okay, okay I am embellishing this slightly for effect! I tended to use Yelp due to the fact it lists places that have vege options whereas Happy Cow tends to be only those places that list with them and identify as veg only. If it wasn’t for the kindness of Funky Love Bunny ( yes that is his real name at Zen Japan in Coffs Harbour, Australia who has this awesome conversion card I surely would have eaten bread for two weeks.  He has sized it so it can be printed on a business card- wonderful idea. Please go visit Funky and his wife Emi at their fantastic Izakaya, well worth the trip.Vegan Convesion Card

I read up on many places to visit but once in a country full of more restaurants than people ( feels like it at times) I found trying to get to these places a bit overwhelming. A few in Tokyo are worthy of mention and relatively easy to find. Kyushu jangara is easy to find, but rather than give directions here, check it on Yelp and follow the map. Also worthy of mention is ramen at Tokyo station called T’s Tan Tan 

On the upside, Japanese food does not contain as much dairy as the western diet so I found that trips to the local convenience store were great. Lawsons stores have a great variety of takeout food and most people understand the word vegetaian. The rice onigiri parcels were the most consistent in terms of selection and even managed to find brown rice offerings. there are always salads and vege sushi available.

Compassionate cooking, vegan, plant based what ever you identify with is on the rise, especially in Australia. Other parts of the world have their traditional meat free dishes which are usually side dishes, and there are plenty of tasty ones in Japan, but on the whole, I found Japan not easy and certainly options were often limited to salad, so be prepared to be viewed as a weirdo for wanting to not eat meat. But hey whats new huh!