India Delhi #4 History abounds.

Visiting India in monsoon is hot, chaotic and can be trying on the most laid back people at times. Remembering we have a cool hotel room to go back to, whilst most people don’t put it into perspective for me quickly.

Sure, we have heat and humidity in Australia, but this is punishing and relentless for Delhites and the rains are welcome, often romantic. My last post was about the two personalities of the monsoon rains, the romance, and the chaos. This is purely about some of the magnificent historical sites there are to see in Delhi.

The Red Fort, like my last three visits to Versailles, this has been closed on each and every of my six visits to Delhi ( sigh). Rookie mistake….check before you go to any monuments. Closed days for most monuments are Mondays but on this occasion, Independence Day is coming up so security preparations are underway.

First stop is the Sikh place of worship. Gurdwara Bangla Sahib. Located very close to Connaught place it is easily accessible and easy to find.

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Inside Gurdwara Bangla Sahib

We were made to feel most welcome here and it is such a calm place. Of note was the large pool, or Sarovar inside the grounds which was a surprise. Built originally in 1783 as a small shrine. The Sikhs have a concept of Langar which means that all people of all race and religion may eat in the Langar halls. My son was told this when he embarked on his overseas travels! As with most places of worship, shoes need to be removed and heads covered.

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Very serene pool, or Sarovar, even with fish!


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Beautiful hypnotic sounds of kirtan playing inside.

Second stop today was India Gate, also under tight security for the upcoming festivities on August 15. India Gate resembles the Arc de Triomphe in Paris and is a 42-metre high war memorial to the 70,000 Indian soldiers who fought for the British in WW1. Designed by Edwin Lutyens, as are many of the British style buildings in Delhi. There is also an eternal flame for the troops killed in the 1971 war with Pakistan. I really have no words apart from what the hell were the British thinking, how dare they come and take over another peoples country …makes me embarrassed of my history. ( that’s a rant for another post!)

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India Gate

The most positive part of this large memorial is the magnificent grounds that surround it and watching families enjoy the sunsets and picnic here.

It seems apt to now mention Mahatma Gandhi, who, through non-violent civil disobedience was the revered leader who led India to Independence and became an inspiration worldwide. At our bus stop was this guy dressed as Gandi with a Charkha. A good definition is given in this article Needless to say he drew a huge crowd and it was quite moving.

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Depiction of Gandhi and his Charkha

A visit to Raj Ghat which is Gandhi’s memorial is moving and left a long lasting impression on me. We didn’t visit there on this trip, so no pictures are included.Needless to say, it is worth the while and certainly to find out more about this remarkable man and his life.

By now monument overload sets in, as frankly there is a lot to see and do and would rather take longer at each one than rush around. The heat at this time of year also makes it slow going. Tip: if possible don’t come at this time of year ( August)

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