KYOTO: Shoguns and Geishas Part 1

I cannot believe I have not been to this wondrous place before. Step back in time to the richness that is the history of Japan. You can almost imagine yourself in the era of the Shoguns. My studies of Japanese history have always held me enthralled with Kyoto and finally, I am here! Kyoto is absolutely charming, quaint alleys, temples and shrines galore, geishas, ryokans, and more modern day offerings such as cute craft beer bars on the river….whats not to love.

Footnote: Two days was not enough but was a great taster. A stay in a Ryokan would be high on my list and more time wandering around Gion at night, especially to some of the more interesting places behind closed doors.

TWO DAYS IN KYOTO

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Prettiness in Gion

 

HOW I GOT HERE- I caught the Platt Kodomo shinkansen from Tokyo station. Obviously dreaming of ancient Japan I ended up in Osaka instead.. hmm rookie error and discovered that the distance is only 15 mins by shinkansen, or 40 mins on the local train, which is a lot cheaper. Telling myself it is all part of the adventure ( secretly irritated at myself) I eventually ended up where I was supposed to be. I discovered that Kyoto is more bus orientated than other cities so again I was glad I didn’t opt for the more expensive rail pass. The buses are easy and a day pass is around Y500

WHERE I STAYED-   I also chose Airbnb for this stay and picked a place near to the beating heart of Kyoto that is Gion. I chose this area as it was central and within safe night walking distance to most places I wanted to go to.

DAY ONE

An early start was in order as I realized there was far more to see here than two days allowed, so don’t try and do too much but rather savor the time exploring fewer places I have decided. I would highly recommend checking insidekyoto.com for their wonderful suggested itineraries, I literally used them as a guide map for everything I did in Kyoto, so helpful and informative plus easy to follow directions and tips.

Tenryu-ji Temple and Gardens – Arashiyama. Easy to get to by train, then a nice walk over the river to the temple and gardens. As it was a hot summer day I tried cucumbers on a stick – really, they are pickled in brine and lemon and were really refreshing. There is a recipe for this in another of my posts, so simple and easy- have a go!

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Pickled cucumbers for a summer snack

The temple itself is a large Zen Temple with some of the most famed gardens in Kyoto. I was here in June which is not as busy as other seasons, I can imagine the splendor of the gardens in both the cherry blossom season and in autumn, of course having to navigate the crowds at this time is a trade off. Personally, I found early June perfect as the crowds have lessened and the weather is warm.

 

 

 

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The walk through the gardens meandered up the hill where I found a temple restaurant called Shigetsu and decided to treat myself, knowing it was all vege cuisine.

 

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Shojin Ryori lunch at Tenryu-ji Temple

Shojin ryori cooking is the Zen Buddhist style that does not allow for strong flavors such as garlic and onions- interestingly similar to some cuisines in India- specifically Jain food. Each meal must have a harmony of the six basic flavors- bitter, sour, sweet, salty, light and hot, and on top of this the three qualities of light and flexible, clean and neat and conscientious and thorough. All meals eaten by the monks are proceeded and followed by verses expressing gratitude…. hmm also not that different from many faiths.
My favorite dish was the one in the top left, made of several components being I think a banana flower- the pink shoot one, a small green perfectly tied bundle with the most delicate matcha flavor mochi I have ever had and konnyaku- the dark brown item. This is the basis for shirataki noodles, a Japanese superfood… it is an acquired taste but the texture is very unique, bouncy and chewy.
I did a basic lesson in this style of cooking and had dreams of mastering this one day. When this food was put in front of me I was in awe of the simplicity and sheer beauty of it, the training, skill and patience involved is something people spend their entire lives perfecting… wow.

After lunch, walking through the gardens was a peaceful way to appreciate the attention to detail and serenity the gardens of this magnificent temple provide to Kyoto and the world.  Everywhere I looked simplicity and beauty shone through.

I again followed the directions of Insidekyoto to the north exit and walked into the incredible Arashiyama bamboo forest. The sheer height and colors combined with the odd dark wooden branches are a photographers dream. As I was here I was remembering my friend and photographer Mike Hollman’s work and marveled at how he managed to get such perfect shots. Head to his page to view these as they are unbelievable. When I saw his shots a year or so ago it made me want to visit and here I am!

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The warmth of the day and the walk provided the perfect excuse for a cool beverage, so off back into the city in search of a spot to sit and people watch. There is the main river running through the city and alongside this are dozens of small restaurants and bars mainly accessed off Pontocho Alley which is very quaint, touristy but still lovely. I found a small bar called Bar Jive up a steep flight of stairs that literally sat about ten people, all of whom were Australians, time to share some stories and cold beer, as we down under are so good at.

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Pontocho Alley

Gion is the centre of the cities nightlife on the opposite side of the river. Here it was important to follow the directions at Insidekyoto to where the geisha stroll about. It is a few streets of the main Dori (street) so could be easily missed. I was completely stunned by the winding cobbled paths, pretty willows ( I think that’s what they were… but just setting the scene) hanging over the shallow streams, cranes standing on one leg, fairy lights strung into the trees and yes, geishas walking the streets to their business. They sure can move quickly in those wooden shoes, I can’t believe I couldn’t snap a decent photo- but I am sure that was how it was meant to be. These pretty back streets are home to any number of very discreet, high-end restaurants and clubs, and I got a distinct impression that foreigners are not all that welcome. This is a case of invites only, on a highly sought after list, which needed forward planning. Never mind, next time I will plan this part better.

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Pretty streams in Gion

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Almost expecting a gondola to float by

A nightcap in a Spanish tapas bar seemed in order to finish off a full day. Japan is a gourmets delight for international cuisine, and not just at the high end as is the case in many countries due to the high cost of internationally trained chefs I am guessing. Whilst I had been told this by my friend and didi (Hindi word for sister) in Tokyo, in my mind this conjured up meals with a Japanese undertone. Well not so, and I take it all back…. the Spanish food I had was just fantastic.

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My spanish drinking pal

End of day one. Kyoto I love you and am so excited for tomorrow. I dream of samurai continues. The below picture marks the end of day one…. Sake and Bed.

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Thank you, and to all a good night.

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